The Fiano grape is most closely associated with the Campanian DOCG wine of Fiano di Avellino. Nearing extinction in the later half of the 20th century, interest in the variety, spearheaded by producers such as Mastroberardino, saw a renaissance of planting around Avellino. Some of the most notable plantings of Fiano are found in hazelnut plantations around Avellino with wine tasters such as Jancis Robinson noting that the wines produced from these grapes can have a slight hazelnut flavor to them.
In 2003, the area around Avellino received DOCG status for the Fiano-based wine produced. For the Fiano di Avellino DOCG, at least 85% of the wine must be made from Fiano with Greco, Coda di Volpe and Trebbiano permitted to round out the remainder of the blend. Grapes destined for this DOCG wine must be limited to a maximum harvest yield of 10 tonnes/hectare and fermented to a minimum alcohol level of 11.5%. Italian wine laws allow for producers to use the name Apianum along with the Fiano di Avellino DOCG designation to show the modern wine’s connection with the historical Roman wine.

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